Monday, September 05, 2011

Daily Digest September 3-4, 2011


The DAILY DIGEST: INFORMATION and OPINION from ST. JOHN'S to VICTORIA.
ARCHIVED at http://cdndailydigest.blogspot.com/

PAPERS PAGEs

ST.JOHN'S TELEGRAM - CORNER BROOK WESTERN STAR - CHARLOTTETOWN GUARDIAN - CAPE BRETON POST - HALIFAX CHRONICLE HERALD - SAINT JOHN TELEGRAPH-JOURNAL - MONTREAL GAZETTE - OTTAWA CITIZEN - KINGSTON WHIG STANDARD- BELLEVILLE INTELLIGENCER - TORONTO STAR - GLOBE & MAIL - NATIONAL POST - SUNS - K-W RECORD - WINNIPEG FREE PRESS - SASKATOON STARPHOENIX - REGINA LEADER-POST - CALGARY HERALD - EDMONTON JOURNAL - RED DEER ADVOCATE - VICTORIA TIMES-COLONIST -
OPINION AND INFORMATION
SEPT 4TH

SEPT 3RD
SEPT 5TH

Rebels poised to attack Gadhafi stronghold
http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2011/09/05/Rebels-poised-to-attack-Gadhafi-stronghold/UPI-61101315201763/

Talks fail with Gadhafi loyalists in desert bastion
Read more: http://www.dailystar.com.lb/2011/Sep-05/147930-talks-fail-with-gadhafi-loyalists-in-desert-bastion.ashx#ixzz1X3uPgymK
(The Daily Star :: Lebanon News :: http://www.dailystar.com.lb)

SEPT 4TH SEPT 3RD
>>>>>>>>>>INFOS <<<<<<<<<<
DIMANCHE 04 SEPTEMBRE 2011
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SAMEDI 03 SEPTEMBRE 2011
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WHICH WAY DO WE GO?


Canada was "best known for supplying troops for peacekeeping missions". Canada, however, has in recent years participated in three "interventionist military missions ".

Stephen Harper's words project this as being Canada's continuing role in the future.

The Editorial from the St. John's Telegram is of the view "Canadians should rightfully question whether this is the direction we wish to head."

Which direction would you and those you know prefer?

The first is that of following Prime Minister Harper's apparent direction of implementing his view that "A handful of soldiers is better than a mouthful of arguments.". A direction in which Canadian Forces are engaging in military missions in far away lands..

The second is developing for Canada the role of being known, through our actions, as the first nation on the scene when others are in need of aid. How? Through strengthening the capabilities of The Disaster Assistance Response Team http://www.cefcom-comfec.forces.gc.ca/pa-ap/ops/fs-fr/dart-eicc-eng.asp .. Through having Canadian Forces ever ready to bring relief when earthquakes or tsunamis or fires strike.

Three of the four perimeters of our country are oceans. Which way would you have Canada go? Establishing a defence perimeter around them to fend off threats from others or this alternative: having Canada and Canadians welcomed by those on the other sides of the oceans as an international paramedic in their times of need?

Think on it. It's one way or the other.

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Words of war
Published on September 3, 2011
The Telegram - Opinion - Editorial
http://www.thetelegram.com/Opinion/Editorial/2011-09-03/article-2740083/Words-of-war/1


It is an interesting choice of words: speaking to Canadian soldiers in Italy ­ more precisely, congratulating them on their role in supporting rebels trying to overthrow Libyan despot Moammar Ghadhafi ­ Prime Minister Stephen Harper chose to use a quote by German physicist and satirist Georg C. Lichtenberg.

Lichtenberg, to be sure, has some fascinating quotations.

There is the insightful "The pleasures of the imagination are as it were only drawings and models which are played with by poor people who cannot afford the real thing."

You also might pick "What is called an acute knowledge of human nature is mostly nothing but the observer's own weaknesses reflected back from others."

Harper, however, picked neither of the above.

Instead, he or his speechwriters chose the slightly frightening, and slightly more war-like, "A handful of soldiers is better than a mouthful of arguments."

Slightly frightening, because it seems to be more evidence of a significant turn in Canada's direction when it comes to international affairs.

Harper went on to say, "This is the best of Canada's military tradition. For we are not a country that makes war for gain or for territory. We do not fight for glory. And if we covet honour, it is only a reputation for doing the right thing in a good cause. That is all. And that is enough."

Harper's speech ­ albeit written for a specific audience ­ echoes comments by members of his cabinet that the costs for the continued conflict in Libya aren't an issue.

Costs aren't an issue internationally, even while Canadians are being told that, inside the country, cost-cutting efforts have to reach everything from marine safety to helping jobless Canadians navigate the Employment Insurance system.

Leaving aside the disparate logic about costs, it's well worth thinking about what kind of role we want our nation to have in the world, and how we want to be seen by other nations.

With our presence in Afghanistan and Libya ­ despite whatever good those missions may have achieved ­ we have still clearly moved from a country best known for supplying troops for peacekeeping missions to a nation willing to ride with countries that see interventionist military missions as the way to go in international affairs.

In his own way, Harper referenced that change in his speech as well: "They used to claim that in international affairs, and you've heard the quote many times: 'Canada punched above its weight.' Well, to punch above your weight, you first have to be able to punch. And that is what you have done here."

It is more than a little unsettling, and Canadians should rightfully question whether this is the direction we wish to head.

And while we're at it, we might stop to consider another Georg C. Lichtenberg quote:  "The most successful tempters and thus the most dangerous are the deluded deluders."

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