Saturday, June 11, 2011

Daily Digest June 11, 2011


The DAILY DIGEST: INFORMATION and OPINION from ST. JOHN'S to VICTORIA.
ARCHIVED at http://cdndailydigest.blogspot.com/

PAPERS PAGEs

ST.JOHN'S TELEGRAM - CORNER BROOK WESTERN STAR - CAPE BRETON POST - HALIFAX CHRONICLE HERALD - SAINT JOHN TELEGRAPH-JOURNAL - MONTREAL GAZETTE - OTTAWA CITIZEN - KINGSTON WHIG STANDARD- TORONTO STAR - GLOBE & MAIL - NATIONAL POST - SUNS - HAMILTON SPECTATOR - ST. CATHARINES STANDARD - K-W RECORD - WINDSOR STAR - SUDBURY STAR - THUNDER BAY CHRONICLE JOURNAL - WINNIPEG FREE PRESS - SASKATOON STARPHOENIX - CALGARY HERALD - GRANDE PRAIRIE DAILY HERALD TRIBUNE - LETHBRIDGE HERALD - RED DEER ADVOCATE - VICTORIA TIMES-COLONIST -
OPINION AND INFORMATION
First skirmish between Kenney and MacKay won't be last
Ivison:
Like Macbeth weighing up the murder of King Duncan, there was "no spur" or motivation for the actions of Peter MacKay and Jason Kenney at the Conservative convention this week, beyond "vaulting ambition" – an intense desire for power – that threatened to o'er leap itself and tear the party apart. MORE...
>>>>>>>>>>INFOS <<<<<<<<<<
SAMEDI 11 JUIN 2011
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VENDREDI 10 JUIN 2011
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Subject: Comments the pungent concerning this week's politics

I wrote to the Economist:

The man who screwed an entire country
http://www.economist.com/node/18805327

Bah! Italy's success at functioning while effectively ungoverned is proof that Italians are as self-reliant as US Republican anarcho-libertarians like people to be.

Just rename the place EuroSomalia and turn it into a zoo ("SEE wild Italians all around you! HEAR them speak and wave their arms all day. SPEAK to them when they ask for news of the outside world.")

Face it: if Cicero couldn't get Romans to behave (from his prosecution of Verrus: "If reason won't bring you back from madness, perhaps shame will."), there's just nothing to be done.

P.P.S. Takes one to know one; or takes a Greek, anyway.  :P

HAAAAAhahahaha … and so much for a future political career. Ain't no WAY I'll ever get elected with this circulating on the Internet.

Pols have no sense of humour these days. Journos too … The Economist's 'Comment Moderator' has deleted my comments for being against the magazine's content policy; something about ethnic-baiting schiess-disturbance, I think.

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From: "S Booiman"
Subject: We don't live in the 19th century

Joe,
 
Reading Mr.Glenn Harewood's underlining comment, am wondering which Quebecers he is talking
about, those in the Quebec dictatorship or the pockets elsewhere in the country funded by Ottawa
to keep them alive.In the Liberal multicultural life style we have been handed pockets of Multi-Ethics.
of which the mixed French speaking culture takes advantage. In a country claiming freedom of speech
and choice putting any one on a pedestal is the wrong way to go, does not matter what history was,
knowing history tells one that some choices that were made may not fit future generations. This is
the 21st century, not the 17 or 18th century. today many English speaking Canadians are denied
employments in this country because of failing to be bilingual, meaning being fluent in French, the
language of 17% of mixed culture and heritage speaking French. The common French speaking is
well aware that speaking English gives a larger opportunity for employment.  That is why it
was expected from Census 2011 to have the language question, so that the French speaking
claim can be enlarged. no matter where they came from or the reason one moved forward to
learn another language. Than not even speaking about the cost mentally and financially. So learned
what is estimated the tax-payer paid quote: (from a study by Mr.Jim Allan CA)
        The total cost of Canada’s Official Bilingualism under its 1969 Official

Languages Act, to March 31, 2010, covering 41 years, is estimated by me, to be about

                                   $1,169,000,000,000.    Federal + Provincial + Private Sector.

unquote.

 
Suan H.Booiman

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Subject: Fukushima Nuclear Disaster: Response to Arthur Topham
From: John Anderson

Hello Joe:

This post responds to Arthur Topham's post in the DD of 09 June 2011 wherein he states that:
"Nuclear energy is insanity posing as a technical Nirvana but ultimately only holds promise of becoming our collective Nemesis. Pushing nuclear power is therefore both logically and morally unjustifiable  ..."
With the greatest respect to Arthur, I cannot agree with this statement.

First, we need to understand very clearly why the Fukushima disaster occurred.

The design of the Fukushima power station included protection against earthquakes and tsunamis -- up to a certain magnitude.  Those design criteria were exceeded, and everything that happened subsequently was an inevitable direct result thereof.

You may ask why the protection criteria were not set higher.  That amounts to 20/20 hindsight.  In hindsight, the design criteria should have been higher, but we must accept that management, on the advice of competent engineers, decided -- at the time -- that the expense of building in higher levels of protection could not be justified.

Therefore, the fact that Fukushima was a nuclear power station is not, in the first instance, the issue.

Second, nuclear energy is not technical insanity.  Nuclear power is a manifestation of physics.

Granted, there have been a number of nuclear power "incidents" in the last sixty years, but the nuclear power industry has learned from every one of them.  (For the record, Canada has had its own nuclear disaster: the 1952 accident with the NRX reactor at Chalk River.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NRX#Accident )

To put all this in perspective, I believe it is appropriate to compare the development and exploitation of nuclear power over the past sixty years to the development and exploitation of steam power in the century between, say, 1820 and 1920.  Today we take steam power, as now manifested in coal-fired and oil-fired "thermal" power stations, for granted.  We consider it "safe".  But no-one in recent memory has ever witnessed the explosion of a major steam power facility.  The explosive power contained in the boilers of these stations is -- awesome, to say the least.  Yet we accept the risks -- because the regulatory regime and industry practices have combined to, over the years, reduce the risks to "acceptable" levels.

I think it is grossly unfair to compare the current state of today's nuclear power industry with the current state of the steam power industry, and then, as a consequence, deny ourselves access to the advantages and potential of nuclear power.  We have learned a lot over the past sixty years and, to close the loop, it is manifestly inaccurate to state that the Fukushima disaster was, in the first instance, attributable to the fact that it was a nuclear facility.

Thirdly, we seem to have glombed onto the idea that "renewable" energy, specifically wind energy and solar energy, is going to solve all of our problems.  There are two major issues with these "renewable" sources.  First, the achievable power density, in terms of kilowatts of generating capacity per hectare of land area, is much too low to ever allow these sources to fully replace our current thermal power and nuclear power capacity.  And, second, the sun does not always shine, and the wind does not always blow.

If we want to use these sources as supplementary energy sources in order to reduce the amount of hydrocarbon fuel or nuclear fuel that gets burned, fine.  But then we must understand that the costs associated with this are supplementary costs, because the primary generating capacity, whether thermal or nuclear, can be reduced only marginally, if at all, and the costs associated therewith remain.

Best Regards, John A.

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From: Rebecca Gingrich

Subject:  I guess this is how you install democracy??  Can't have the people of Canada believing they should get a payment from the oil produced here, now can we?

NATO's "Alternate Universe" in Libya
http://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2011/06/08/natos-alternate-universe-in-libya.html
The Pentagon and its NATO partners are engaged in one of the most obvious and intensive propaganda ploys in their military operations against Libya since the days leading up to the "Coalition of the Willing" attack on Iraq. Suggestions that the government of Muammar Qaddafi is on its last legs and that life in Tripoli has drawn to a standstill as a result of the NATO bombing campaign are not based on reality, as any unbiased observer who has recently been in Tripoli, has witnessed…
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Subject: [On-Guard] the real reason for multiculturalism
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDh1yeXsvZA

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From: "Efstratios (Stratos) Psarianos"
Subject: Funny Cuz It's True (Sort Of) ... Another edition of raw political commentary

From: The Natroses

Hi Joe, Of all places, The Canada Free Press -  I read an article that I agree with word to word, and I am impressed with a writer who is relatively young to speak such words. He must have an old soul.

" The rise of Western democracy was the rise of the Middle Class protecting its rights and its interests. Now the Middle Class is dying,  it is being replaced by a class of professional government workers subsidized by the slowly dying industries that once powered the commerce of a mighty nation. It cannot be exported by NGO's or replicated by global covenants. Not when the same progressives vowing to export democracy and human rights are hard at work crushing them at home.
The progressive ideal is a tragic misunderstanding ending in national catastrophe. The idealization of government is not only the second best possible route to tyranny, but also the death of the institutions that generate a nation's vitality. Reformers champion change, but their worship of government leads to static systems that make change and reform impossible. Their final vision of world government is an idealized failure from the start. Their failure to understand the nature of power and the extent to which their own ideals are cultural, rather than universal, dooms their inevitable world order to be not only not inevitable, but impossible."
 
http://canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/37327

At last, history catches up to Karl Marx. The West has grown from anarchy (pre-Roman times); empire (Romans); anarchy again then empire then feudalism (the Frankish Empire); then centralized monarchy (c. Louis 13 in France); then evolution/revolution starting with American independence and the French Revolution.
 
Summarily: war chiefs have been neutralized; then emperors; then landed nobility; then kings, lords, and squires; and recently the proles. NOW what's next … the POOR rising up? WHEN will this END?!?

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