Sunday, April 10, 2011

Daily Digest April 10, 2011


The DAILY DIGEST: INFORMATION and OPINION from ST. JOHN'S to VICTORIA.
ARCHIVED at http://cdndailydigest.blogspot.com/

PAPERS PAGEs

ST.JOHN'S TELEGRAM - CHARLOTTETOWN GUARDIAN - HALIFAX CHRONICLE HERALD - SAINT JOHN TELEGRAPH-JOURNAL -
Atlantic Canada has a say in this federal election
MONTREAL GAZETTE - OTTAWA CITIZEN - KINGSTON WHIG STANDARD- TORONTO STAR - GLOBE & MAIL - NATIONAL POST - SUNS - HAMILTON SPECTATOR - K-W RECORD - SUDBURY STAR - THUNDER BAY CHRONICLE JOURNAL - WINNIPEG FREE PRESS - SASKATOON STARPHOENIX - REGINA LEADER-POST - CALGARY HERALD - EDMONTON JOURNAL - GRANDE PRAIRIE DAILY HERALD TRIBUNE - LETHBRIDGE HERALD - VANCOUVER SUN - VANCOUVER PROVINCE - VICTORIA TIMES-COLONIST -
OPINION AND INFORMATION


>>>>>>>>>>INFOS <<<<<<<<<<
DIMANCHE 10 AVRIL 2011
Harper refuse d'expliquer les coupes prévues
http://www.cyberpresse.ca/actualites/elections-federales/201104/10/01-4388375-harper-refuse-dexpliquer-les-coupes-prevues.php  Hydrocarbures dans le St-Laurent: les communautés côtières s'inquiètent
http://www.cyberpresse.ca/environnement/201104/10/01-4388359-hydrocarbures-dans-le-st-laurent-les-communautes-cotieres-sinquietent.php
11h15 - Élections fédérales · La hache ne s'abattra pas à Ottawa


BELOW(30)(30)(30)(30)(30)30)(30)(30)(30)(30)(30)30)(30)(30)(30)(30)(30)30)(30)(30)(30)(30)(30)(30)(30)(30)30)(30)(30)(30)(30)30)30)(30)(30)(30)(30)(30)(30)(30)

A Coalition

Is it to you agreeing to develop and vote for the same policy directions OR Cabinets with members from more than one party?

Makes a difference, to me at least. How about you?


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From: "Richard Neumann"
Subject: Bloc Double Standard


Joe:
 
Gilles Duceppe's argument that the Tories have a double standard in that they have a different campaign theme in Quebec than in the rest of the country is, of course, laughable coming from him.  He has no campaign theme in the rest of the country, as the Bloc has no candidates in the rest of the country.  Indeed, the entire premise of the Bloc's very existence is that Quebec is different than TROC, must be treated differently, and eventually must become an independent nation because of those differences.  He might better be suited complimenting the Conservatives for messaging differently in that province, a defacto recognition that campaigning in Quebec must recognize unique challenges not encountered elsewhere. 
 
As I've stated previously, Duceppe has a strategic dilemma in this campaign.  If he makes enough noise to be heard outside of his own province, his very presence in the campaign assists the Conservatives in the rest of the country, making it more likely his party would be marginalized under a majority Harper government.  If he keeps quiet and does not beat the nationalist drum, he risks losing the support of some of his soft left-leaning support to the NDP, splitting his vote at the potential loss of a couple of seats, or at the very least a lost opportunity to gain a couple from the Conservatives.
 
Duceppe has been hiding in rural Quebec for the first two weeks, but he has no choice but to come out of the trees for the debates this week.  When he makes reference to those issues that have irked Quebecers, like arena funding or loan guarantees to Newfoundland, he must know that the Conservative position is one with significant support outside that province.  Further, he must know that whenever he states that the Conservatives are not responding to the needs of Quebecers he is sending a signal in TROC that the Conservatives are not being held hostage to separatist demands.  Duceppe remains the coalition wild card, and a real threat to Ignatieff in TROC.  Even in Quebec, Duceppe knows that if he points out too strongly that the federalist parties are not responding to Quebec's interests, he is in fact questioning the Bloc's own ability to defend Quebec in Ottawa.  His soft sell message, that the Bloc can stop a Harper majority thereby strengthening its position visa-vis the other parties, only serves to support Harper's contention of a willing Bloc participant in a defacto coalition of the left. 
 
As for the Conservative strategy of running dual campaigns, that would be marketing 101 and something adhered to by Liberals and Conservatives since time immemorial.  As long as the strategy is one of emphasis, and there is no direct contradiction to be found, it does not present an issue for Harper.  It needs some control to ensure that does not happen, and we all know that if anything, the Conservatives do appreciate a controlled message.
 
Richard

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